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Cisco 800M Series ISR Software Configuration Guide

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The documentation set for this product strives to use bias-free language. For the purposes of this documentation set, bias-free is defined as language that does not imply discrimination based on age, disability, gender, racial identity, ethnic identity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and intersectionality. Exceptions may be present in the documentation due to language that is hardcoded in the user interfaces of the product software, language used based on RFP documentation, or language that is used by a referenced third-party product. Learn more about how Cisco is using Inclusive Language.

Basic Router Configuration

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Chapter: Basic Router Configuration

Configuring global parameters, configuring gigabit ethernet wan interfaces, example: configuring the loopback interface, verifying the loopback interface configuration, configuring command-line access, configuring gigabit ethernet lan interfaces, example: configuring static routes, verifying configuration, example: rip configuration, verifying rip configuration, example: configuring eigrp, verifying eigrp configuration, push button behavior during rommon initialization, push button behavior when ios is up and running.

This module provides basic configuration procedures for the Cisco 800M Series ISR and contains the following sections.

Configuring a Loopback Interface

Configuring static routes, configuring dynamic routes, configuring image and configuration recovery using the push button, configuring 800m series isr using zero touch deployment.

To configure the global parameters for your router, follow these steps.

SUMMARY STEPS

Detailed steps.

You can connect WAN interfaces either by using straight polarity connectors or reversed polarity connectors.

To configure Gigabit Ethernet (GE) WAN interfaces, follow these steps, beginning in global configuration mode.

The loopback interface acts as a placeholder for the static IP address and provides default routing information.

To configure a loopback interface, follow these steps, beginning in global configuration mode.

The loopback interface in this sample configuration is used to support Network Address Translation (NAT) on the virtual-template interface. This configuration example shows the loopback interface configured on the gigabit ethernet interface with an IP address of 200.200.100.1/24, which acts as a static IP address. The loopback interface points back to virtual-template1, which has a negotiated IP address.

To verify that you have properly configured the loopback interface, enter the show interface loopback command as shown in the following example.

You can lso verify the loopback interface by using the ping command as shown in the following example.

To configure parameters to control access to the router, perform the following steps.

To manually configure Gigabit Ethernet (GE) LAN interfaces, follow these steps, beginning in global configuration mode.

Static routes provide fixed routing paths through the network. They are manually configured on the router. If the network topology changes, the static route must be updated with a new route. Static routes are private routes unless they are redistributed by a routing protocol.

To configure static routes, perform these steps in global configuration mode.

In the following configuration example, the static route sends out all IP packets with a destination IP address of 192.168.1.0 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 on the Gigabit Ethernet interface to another device with an IP address of 10.10.10.2. Specifically, the packets are sent to the configured PVC.

You do not need to enter the command marked “(default).” This command appears automatically in the configuration file generated when you use the show running-config command.

To verify that you have properly configured static routing, enter the show ip route command and look for static routes signified by the “S.”

You should see verification output similar to the following:

In dynamic routing, the network protocol adjusts the path automatically, based on network traffic or topology. Changes in dynamic routes are shared with other routers in the network.

The Cisco routers can use IP routing protocols, such as Routing Information Protocol (RIP) or Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP), to learn routes dynamically. You can configure either of these routing protocols on your router.

Configuring Routing Information Protocol

To configure the RIP routing protocol on the router, follow these steps, beginning in global configuration mode.

The following configuration example shows RIP version 2 enabled in IP network 10.0.0.0 and 192.168.1.0.

To see this configuration, use the show running-config command from privileged EXEC mode.

To verify that you have properly configured RIP, enter the show ip route command and look for RIP routes signified by “R” as shown in this example.

Configuring Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol

To configure Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EGRP), perform these steps.

This configuration example shows the EIGRP routing protocol enabled in IP networks 192.145.1.0 and 10.10.12.115. The EIGRP autonomous system number is 109.

To see this configuration use the show running-config command, beginning in privileged EXEC mode.

To verify that you have properly configured EIGRP, enter the show ip route command, and look for EIGRP routes indicated by “D “ as shown in the following example:

A push or reset button is available on the rear side of the Cisco 800M Series ISR and it is designed to provide a disaster recovery method for the router.

Push button can be useful for recovery during one of the two scenarios:

Table 2-1 shows the high level functionality when the push button is pressed during ROMMON initialization.

Table 2-1 Push Button Functionality During ROMMON Initialization

If you press the push button for more than three seconds and then release the push button after IOS is up and running, IOS detects this event and looks for configuration files in the order of priority.If the IOS finds the configuration file, it copies the configuration file to the startup configuration file. Then the router reloads itself and the new configuration takes effect. If the configuration files cannot be found, pressing reset button has no effect.

The order of priority in which the router looks for configuration file is given as follows:

The Zero Touch Deployment (ZTD) through USB feature in Cisco 800M Series ISRs is an ease-of-use feature that loads a customized configuration from a USB flash drive. This feature requires that the router has no startup configuration in its nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM). The feature also requires that a valid configuration file, with the filename extension .cfg , is stored in the USB flash drive. A valid configuration file can be created by saving the running configuration of a router to flash, USB flash, or to a TFTP Server.

When a router with no startup configuration boots up, it checks for a valid configuration file within the USB flash drive. The pre-requisites for deployment using the Zero Touch Deployment through USB feature are:

If the USB flash drive has multiple.cfg files, the router chooses the one with the highest index number in the USB Flash drive. To avoid loading an incorrect.cfg file, ensure that there is only one.cfg file in the USB flash drive.

The Cisco 800M Series ISR uses second core and it is actively used in detecting USB flash drive if 3G Wireless WAN module is present on the router. If 3G Wireless WAN module is not present, USB flash drive is detected by the IOS. When 3G Wireless WAN module is present, USB detection is a bit delayed for the Cisco 800M series ISR due to the delay in second core initialization. While system startup is in progress and push button is pressed, a timer is started to check the completion of second core initialization. For some reason if second core takes more time, system reports an error message and continues the normal start up. After second core initialization router waits up to 10 seconds for USB detection and then complete the configuration. In case the USB flash drive does not contain a deployment configuration, router enters the configuration mode.

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How to Configure IP Addresses on a Cisco Router

How to Configure IP Addresses on a Cisco Router picture: A

Configuring routers is a routine operation for network administrators. Enterprise-grade routers are very different from consumer-grade routers, though. Consumer-grade routers come mostly configured out of the box. Likewise, consumer-grade ISP services typically configure home ‘routers’ with a dynamic IP address. 

In contrast, business-grade ISP services assign static IP addresses. Before an enterprise-grade router can be installed in a network, it needs to have an IP address assigned to it first. So, we will walk through how to configure an IP address on a Cisco router today.

Configuring a Cisco router with an IP address is not a complicated process. There are typically four steps involved:

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Verify the current interface configuration of the router

Choose the interface that you want to assign an IP address to

Assign the IP address

Enable the interface on the Cisco router

We will walk through each of those steps, explain how to complete them, and why they are essential. 

An Overview of How to Configure IP Addresses on Cisco Devices [VIDEO]

In this video, Jeremy Cioara covers assigning IP addresses and enabling interfaces on Cisco routers. Unlike switches, which are essentially plug and play, routers require a bit of configuration before they can do what they were designed to. You'll see a straightforward, four-step process to enabling interfaces that will equip you to do this yourself.

How to Display Interfaces on a Cisco Device

Before you assign an IP address to a Cisco router, you need to know the current configuration of that device. Typically, Cisco routers have all their interfaces shut down out of the box. Therefore, we need to verify the state of those interfaces before proceeding, especially if this router is being re-used. 

The rest of the instructions through this article will assume that you are connected to the Cisco router. 

To show the interfaces in a Cisco router, use the ‘show IP interface brief’ command in the console window. For example, this command will output the following information:

Each interface and interface name

The IP address for that interface

Whether each interface is up or down on the Layer 1 level (status column)

Whether each interface is up or down on the Layer 2 level (protocol column)

The Status and Protocol columns will have one of three messages:

Administratively Down

Each message has a clear indication of the status of its associated interface. The ‘Up’ message is self-explanatory. That means that the associated interface is working correctly. The ‘Administratively Down’ message indicates that the interface is disabled by configuration. Otherwise, the network admin purposefully disabled that interface for some reason. Finally, the ‘Down’ message means the associated interface isn’t working for other reasons (like unplugging the network cable from the network port). 

Out of the box, Cisco routers have the ‘Administratively Down’ configuration for each interface. This is different from Cisco Switches. Cisco Switches come pre-configured out of the box. They can be safe to implement into an existing network almost right away. On the other hand, an unconfigured router can make a network inoperable. 

That’s because an improperly configured router can send data from the network into a black hole. Routers are the pieces of equipment that push data to and from networks or network segments. If a router isn’t correctly configured, it won’t know where to send that information to. Hence, that data is sent to purgatory. It is simply dropped from the network. 

So, you need to verify the status of the interfaces on a Cisco router before you configure an IP address for it. We need to configure as much of the router as possible before connecting it to a network, so this is an excellent first step. 

What is the Difference Between Status and Protocol on a Cisco Router?

When you use the ‘show IP interface brief’ command in the console when connected to a Cisco router, the router will dump information about each interface on the router to the console display. That information will include the link-state labeled as ‘Status’ and ‘Protocol.’

Many new network admins may not understand the difference between both states. After all, aren’t they both the same?

The ‘Status’ and ‘Protocol’ states represent different layers of the OSI networking model , though. The ‘Status’ column represents Layer one, or the physical connection layer. The ‘Protocol’ column represents Layer 2 of the OSI model. The physical layer explains whether a cable is physically connected or if the physical hardware for that interface is working correctly. The protocol layer explains whether that interface is receiving signals that it can understand and recognize. 

Understanding the difference between Layer 1 and Layer 2 and their operational status is essential for configuring Cisco routers and diagnosing issues with them down the road. 

How to Choose an Interface to Assign an IP Address on a Cisco Device

When we configure an IP address for a new Cisco router, we need to verify the current state of the interfaces of that router. After we confirm the state of those interfaces, we need to select an interface in the console before configuring an IP address. This process is easy. 

Running the ‘show IP interface brief’ command in the console of a Cisco router will list each interface and the designation for those interfaces. Pay attention to those interfaces. Also, make sure to match the interface in the console with the physical interface on the Cisco router. That way, you don’t plug the ethernet cable into the wrong port. 

To select an interface in the console, first enter the global configuration mode in the router. Then, use the ‘configure terminal’ command in the console to enter configuration mode. 

After switching to the configuration mode in the router, use the ‘interface’ command followed by the interface itself to select that interface. You can also add a question mark after the ‘interface’ command instead of the interface designation for additional help. 

Interface g0/0

In the example above, we used interface g0/0. That means we selected the first interface that is a gigabit ethernet port on our router. The interfaces in your Cisco router may be labeled differently depending on the device you are configuring. 

How to Assign an IP Address to a Cisco Router

Before we can assign an IP address to a Cisco router, we need to complete a couple of steps. First, we need to run the ‘show IP interface brief’ command. This will list each interface in the router as well as their status. Then, we need to enter global configuration mode with the ‘configure terminal’ command and select an interface using the ‘interface’ command in the console of that router. The ‘interface’ command must be followed by the interface designation. Once we have our interface selected, we can assign an IP address to it. 

Assigning an IP address to an interface in a Cisco router is as simple as using the ‘IP address’ command. That command must be followed by the IP address for that interface port as well as its subnet.

Ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0

Entering that command will not produce any confirmation messages unless there was an error. In this case, no news is good news. 

After assigning the IP address to an interface in a Cisco router, run the ‘show IP interface brief’ command again. When that command displays information about each interface in the router, you should see the IP address assigned to your chosen interface under the IP address column. If you do not, try repeating the process. 

That’s it! It’s that simple to assign an IP address to a Cisco router.

How to Find the IP Address to Assign to a Cisco Router

Many new network admins may not understand where to find the IP address to assign to a new Cisco router. Those admins may have received that information from a senior network administrator or through documentation, but if those resources aren’t available, where would you find the IP address to assign to a Cisco router?

Often, that information comes from the ISP (Internet Service Provider). Businesses will typically choose to have a static IP address assigned to them from their ISP. 

This is done for stability reasons. In a dynamic environment, the external IP address of a network can be changed by the ISP. If your business hosts something like a VPN , though, that could be an issue. Static IP addresses keep network configurations static for things like VPNs or DNS entries. 

This is in stark contrast to the typical consumer-grade ISP connection. In these cases, the ISP will always use DHCP to assign a network address to consumer customers. But, of course, a business can use DHCP addresses, too. This is more common with small and medium-sized companies that may not need to host services that depend on a static IP address. 

Cisco routers can be configured to use DHCP instead of being assigned a static IP address, too. To do that, add ‘dhcp’ instead of the IP address and subnet mask to the ‘IP address’ command in the console in a Cisco router.

Ip address DHCP

How to enable an interface on a cisco router.

After configuring an IP address for a Cisco router, you will most likely need to enable the interface to be active. Cisco routers come with all the interfaces on them shut down out of the box. This is for important network safety reasons. So, the interface you just configured needs to be enabled. 

First, we can verify a Cisco router’s status and configuration using the ‘show run’ command from the configuration console for a Cisco device. That command will display all the current information for that device and its interfaces. More than likely, the information displayed from that command will be too much to fit on your screen. Use the space button to jump through the configuration information.

Look for the configuration information for the interface you need to enable. This should show that the interface is currently administratively down. 

Once the status of that interface has been verified, we need to enable it. First, we need to select that interface. Use the ‘interface’ command in the console followed by the interface name.

E.g., interface GigabitEthernet0/0

In our example, the name of the interface we are working with is GigabitEthernet0/0. Of course, the name of the interface you are working with may be different.

Now that the interface is selected, use the ‘no shutdown’ command to enable that interface. If all goes well, you should see three messages. The first message shows that the interface is down. The next two messages should state that the ‘Status’ and ‘Protocol’ are now up. You should also see lights blinking next to the physical interface port that you just configured on the router. 

Remember that the status and protocol states in a Cisco router represent different layers of the OSI network model. The status state represents layer 1, while the protocol state represents layer 2. This is why the console shows two different status prompts after running the ‘no shutdown’ command. 

Wrapping Up

We covered a lot of information in this article! Consider this guide a rough tutorial on assigning an IP address to a Cisco router. Still, we did not cover other important topics like what a subnet is or how to secure a router. If you would like to learn more, consider our CCNA training . 

Though assigning an IP address to a Cisco router is easy, it is also very routine. Furthermore, this is a function that you will perform a lot as a network admin. So, let’s go over how to assign an IP address to a Cisco router with a short and sweet tl;dr instruction set.

Verify the interface status with the ‘show IP interface brief’ command.

After verifying all interfaces are down, enter global configuration mode with the ‘configure terminal’ command.’

Select the interface you want to configure with the ‘interface’ command followed by the interface name.

Assign an IP address to that interface with the ‘ip address’ command followed by the IP address and the subnet mask for that interface.

Run the ‘show IP interface brief’ command again to verify the IP address has been assigned to the network interface. 

Run the ‘no shutdown’ command to enable that interface. 

That’s it! Keep these instructions handy until they become second nature. Businesses use static IP addresses for all sorts of things, but above all else, they use static IP addresses to keep networks from breaking or requiring additional maintenance. Understanding how to assign an IP address to a Cisco router is vital for any network admin.

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Configure an IP address on a switch

By default, Cisco switches forward Ethernet frames without any configuration. This means that you can buy a Cisco switch, plug in the right cables to connect various devices to the switch, power it on, and the switch will work properly.

However, to perform switch management over the network or use protocols such as SNMP, the switch will need to have an IP address. The IP address is configured under a logical interface, known as the management domain or VLAN. Usually, the default VLAN 1 acts like the switch’s own NIC for connecting into a LAN to send IP packets. Here are the steps to configure an IP address under VLAN 1:

Here is a simple example network:

Configure IP address on a switch example network

We have a simple network of a host and a switch. We can assign the switch with an IP address to enable IP communication between the two devices:

To verify the IP address set on a switch, we can use the show int vlan 1 command:

We can verify that the host can reach the switch using its IP address by pinging it from Host A:

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Configure IP Address For an Interface in Cisco

The interface is the port at which the router connects to a given network. It acts as an entry or exit point for data that is to be transmitted through the router. Every interface must be labeled or assigned an IP address, which should be unique among all the IP addresses in the network. 

In Cisco Packet Tracer, to understand the process of assigning IP addresses , we will be using routers. This is because a router has many interfaces to connect to different networks and also after configuring a router by any routing protocol( RIP , static routing , etc.), we can observe how an interface and an IP address work in a router. 

Steps to configure an IP address for an interface of a router in Cisco Packet Tracer:

Step 1: Open Cisco Packet Tracer and select the following devices:

IPv4 Addressing Table:

Step 2: In Cisco Packet Tracer, assigning IP addresses to an interface of a router can either be done through the command line or the GUI mode. Both of them are discussed as follows:

Through command line mode:

Interface [label of the interface]:

For example:

IP address [IP address to be assigned] [subnet mask of the IP address]

Following is the image of the command line of the router after configuring all interfaces:

For a better understanding of the process, you may refer to the following simulation:

Through GUI mode:

The interface of the router has been assigned an IP address.

Simulation Result:

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    Assigning an IP address to an interface in a Cisco router is as simple as using the 'IP address' command. That command must be followed by the

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    Assigning IP addresses to multiple switches in the same network can save the time for configuration. This video introduces how to assign IP

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    Author and talk show host Robert McMillen explains the commands for changing an IP address on a Cisco router. This How To Video also has

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    In this tutorial video we're going to learn and configure ip address in Cisco Router using Cisco Packet Tracer Software.

  9. Configure IP Address For an Interface in Cisco

    Click on any router and select the Config tab from the above tabs. · Now find the interface to which you want to assign the IP address, from the

  10. Configuring an IP address on an Interface

    Assigning an IP address to an interface is the foundational requirement for all Cisco devices as Cisco devices are networking devices. You can however assign